MRI Applications

MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI)

AN OVERVIEW OF THE APPLICATIONS FOR SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY PRACTICE


What are the indications for use?

Spinal Disease

Imaging of spinal disease has traditionally relied upon plain radiography and almost invariably, myelography. The latter can be a time consuming and technically demanding procedure for some specialists with some risk of post study complications (e.g. seizures) or non-diagnostic studies (e.g. due to diffuse cord swelling). MRI allows for rapid localization and characterization of spinal lesions, with negligible risks.

Intracranial Disease

MRI is currently the best way of imaging intracranial disease, as it is not impeded by the bone of the cranial vault and it provides superior detail of soft tissue structures compared with CT-scans. This makes it invaluable for the diagnosis of brain tumors.

While relatively uncommon in small animals, the incidence of CNS neoplasia has probably been under-diagnosed historically, due to lack of appropriate imaging facilities. In some cases, long term remission can be achieved by surgical removal/debulking or radiotherapy. In addition, we have found that many clients appreciate a definitive diagnosis, and thus accurate prognosis in such cases, even if they elect not to proceed with further treatment.

Furthermore, ruling out intracranial space occupying lesions early can help direct other diagnostic and therapeutic efforts.

Epilepsy

Primary epilepsy usually starts early in life, but can occur at any age. Given that late-onset epilepsy is also treatable with anti-convulsants, it is important to rule out neoplastic/inflammatory disease in the older patient. Ideally, all cases presenting with altered mentation or seizures, irrespective of age, would receive a brain scan to rule out underlying disease as part of a thorough work-up.

Nasal Disease

Radiography and endoscopy with cytology or biopsy are currently the mainstay of diagnosis in chronic nasal discharge, epistaxis, and sneezing. However, cytology has a low sensitivity for intra-nasal neoplasia; biopsies may be non-diagnostic (often due to non-representative sampling of associated inflammatory tissue); radiography is non-specific and does not delineate soft tissue masses clearly; and rhinoscopy can be hampered by lack of access to the entire nasal cavity and a field of view impeded by debris, discharge, and hemorrhage.

Historically, many cases of intranasal disease have only been diagnosed by exploratory rhinotomy – inherently an invasive procedure. MRI will evaluate the nature of abnormal soft tissue and determine the extent of the lesion, including any involvement of adjacent structures. It is therefore useful in the diagnosis of tumors, foreign bodies, and fungal disease.

ORBITAL DISEASE

MRI is highly superior to radiographic techniques. Radiographs are helpful in cases where neoplastic disease extends markedly beyond the orbit. Ultrasonography often gives both false positive and false negative diagnoses for neoplastic masses. MRI is recommended for patients in which radiography and ultrasonography fail to produce a confident diagnosis and to plan surgical procedures

OTHER SOFT TISSUES

MRI shows great promise in characterizing hepatic, splenic, renal, and pelvic lesions. The difficulty with this is the time required to achieve a scan, which can result in movement artifacts. New protocols have been revised to avoid such complications.

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